Congestion Pricing: Time to Sack Up

Congestion Pricing Supporters

People are all over Mayor Bloomberg’s Congestion Pricing plan. The opponents keep calling it a tax, because the word “tax” sounds evil. In reality, it’s a toll. Sure, there’s an argument to be made about tolls really just being taxes, but let’s call it what it is. It’s a toll for driving in the heart of Manhattan during peak times.

And it’s not a toll just for New Yorkers. It’s a toll for anyone who wants to drive in Manhattan during peak times.

One thing people who appose the plan conveniently forget to mention is that the toll is not in $8.00 in addition to the tolls you paid to get into the city. If you paid a $4.00 toll on a bridge or tunnel, you would only owe $4 bucks more (for a total of $8.00). So you won’t be charged $12.00.

The technology exists to make all that possible, it’s just a matter of implementing it.

Also, studies have shown that there wont be much impact on outer borough residents. Most outer borough peeps take mass transit into the city anyway, so what’s the big deal?

For that matter, when are people going to wake up and realize that cutting back on pollution is going to cost money? Simply asking people to cut back on their driving doesn’t work. As Bloomberg says, the only way people are going to stop is if it his them in the wallet.

Not only that, but the plan makes NYC eligible for $500 million in federal funds to get the program off and running.

The opposition:

“It is not a coincidence that regions considered hubs for mass transit contain a significant percentage of the population affected by health disorders that stem from pollution such as asthma,” [City Councilman David] Weprin’s report said. “If … more cars equal more pollution, then how can it be argued that more cars going to these neighborhoods will not also lead to more pollution for them?”

Maybe the above is correct, but you’ve got to start somewhere. Any action is always going to produce some sort of negative reaction. Not doing anything is going to produce and even worse consequence. So we had better start trying things. First roll out the current plan. Then come up with other solutions for areas mentioned by Weprin.

Look at it from the flip side of the coin. SUBWAYblogger (and many other New Yorkers) doesn’t own a car, and rely solely on mass transit. So why should we have to breath in your exhaust? If you still want to drive, fine, but it’s gonna cost you. You $8.00 will go toward making life better for the rest of us.

Photo: Newsday

7 thoughts on “Congestion Pricing: Time to Sack Up

  1. The flaw in Weprin’s argument is that congestion pricing isn’t going to bring more cars to these border neighborhoods. It’ll bring less. That’s the way it happened in London and in Stockholm, and it could happen here if Weprin shook off some of his antiquated ideas about traffic flow.

    Like

  2. Oh give me a break, this congestion plan is nothing but a sham to get federal money. The mass transit system is bursting at the seams in many places already. The last thing it needs is an influx of more passengers.

    The sad part is how supporters keep trying to bring up asthma to support the plan. This argument is another sham. The highest concentrated area of asthma cases is nowhere near the areas destined for less traffic. So who exactly is benefiting from this plan again?

    The plan will not make our area a better place, it will just cause more problems. People looking to avoid the costs will clearly park in the outer boroughs & hop on buses & trains. So take away parking for legitimate residents, bring in more traffic, etc…

    Yep, this plan is a winner for all of NYC.

    Like

  3. Ok David…you and I agree on most every transit issue out there, but I gotta call a time out on this one buddy. That’s saying considering no one bitches more about subway crowding than me!

    Oh give me a break, this congestion plan is nothing but a sham to get federal money…

    Not so much. The money goes to offset the costs of the proposed plan. Not only do you need to set up city cameras, easy pass readers, etc, but you’d also need to beef up the current transit system to improve capacity. There’s staffing and whatnot too. So congestion pricing would be way more difficult to do without the $500 million + from the feds.

    So who exactly is benefiting from this plan again?

    The bottom line is better air quality, less traffic and insanity during rushes, and an improved transit system. In sort, better quality of life for everyone, including drivers.
    I could go on, but…

    Like

  4. I said it before and I’ll say it again, eight and a half million people aren’t going to disappear because you decide to put a tax/toll on Manhattan. The city has a lot of people. It’s just that simple.

    Also, don’t give me that crap about the money collected will go to improve the system. First off, I’m sure these scumbags at the DOT and the MTA will just pocket that money. And second, why can’t they do a better job with the money they have already? Do you know how much money the subway, bus and commuter train fares generate? Throwing more money at these idiots will only make them fatter and lazier. Gee, I wish I could do a half-assed job and then whine about how I don’t have enough money to do better!

    Like

  5. I said it before and I’ll say it again, eight and a half million people aren’t going to disappear because you decide to put a tax/toll Manhattan. The city has a lot of people. It’s just that simple.

    Also, don’t give me crap about that money collected will go to better the system. First off, I’m sure these scumbags at the DOT and the MTA will just pocket that money. And second, why can’t they do a better job with the money they have already? Do you know how much money the subway, bus and commuter train fares generate? Throwing more money at these idiots will only make them fatter and lazier. Gee, I wish I could do a half-assed job and then whine about how I don’t get enough money to do better! Poor me!

    Like

  6. You’ve probablay already mentioned this in an earlier post, but I think the tricky part is that mass transit is already operating at peak capacity on many of its lines.

    The thought of all the usual drivers trying to pile into the already packed subway-cars makes me shudder.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s