Broken Subway Door?

It’s a good thing I snagged a seat today, or it would have been a pretty crappy way to start my morning.

At 28th Street, my train was stuck in the station because of a door problem. Perhaps some of the motormen that read this blog can chime in on what can cause this.

Clearly it was not something that was going to raise a red flag on this insanely crowded train because they managed to get it fixed after about 15 minutes of waiting.

I was about 3 train car lenghts away from the door that had the issue, so I could see them trying to fix it.  It consisted of one guy hitting the door close button over and over again while the other physically pushed the doors together with his hands.

From what I could see, the doors were closing just fine on their own.  I’m not sure what pushing the doors together by hand was adding to the equation.  I guess he was just trying to get the sensor to engage or something.  If you stepped back and looked, you would have no idea something was wrong with the door because it closed all the way by itself.

After the threee stooges finished slamming the doors together over and over again, we got back on our way.  Of course, we were so far behind that we immdediately had to start skipping stops to get caught up.

A frustrating way to start your Monday.

Another Nail in the Fare Hike Coffin

Aaaand we inch ever closer to the $2.50 single ride and the $103 monthly unlimited. The final vote is Wednesday.

I don’t claim to be that good at math, but eventually the unlimited card is just not worth it.  I mean, the average commuter is going to take the train twice a day, 5 days a week, 4 weeks a month.  That’s 40 total rides.  At $2.50 a ride, that’s $100.

Eventually, I think I’m just going to buy a $100 regular card and get my extra 6 free rides ($15).  There’s rarely a month that goes by where I take 6 rides on the weekend.  When I head out on the weekend, I’m usually cabbing it up.

Another Metrocard Machine Run-in

It took me nearly 15 minutes to get a new Metrocard today.  What a freaking cluster f*ck.

I happen to be at a station that is under construction, so it only has two machines at this entrance.  Of course, there’s always a line because there’s only the two machines.

So I got in line.  Once I finally got to the front of the line, I’ll bet you can guess what happened.  No credit cards.

For whatever reason, the credit card reader wasn’t able to read my card.  At first I thought it was just me.

So I got back into line for the second machine.  From there, I saw that other people were having the same issue I did with my original machine.  So I had to wait in line all overagain.

You know, I really need to get involved with TransitChex or something.  I’m getting pretty sick of this crap.

Federal Bailout the MTA?

http://www.nbcnewyork.com/syndication?id=36806859&path=%2Fnews%2Fbusiness

Hell, why not?  If banks, auto manufacturers, and more are all bellying up to the pork buffet, why can’t the MTA?

Senator Chuck Schumer wants the federal government to write a check for a few billion dollars to bail out the MTA.

Just think, this could have been done back when Congestion Pricing was all the rage.  It wouldn’t have been a bailout either.  Under the Congestion Pricing plan, the city would have received a massive grant to fund the building of the infrastructure to get the system off the ground…to the tune of $500 million.  Much of it would have also went to improving services to handle the expected increase in ridership.

Then, the city would have created a new and massive revenue source…all of the congestion pricing fees (taxes) that could have been funneled right back into maintaining the MTA services.

But noooo…we had to block that.  F*cking idiots.  Everyone who opposed that plan should be booted out of office.

Would it have completely avoided the current crisis?  Probably not, but it would have done a ton to make it better.  The estimated yearly revenue generated from the congestion pricing plan is around $491 million.  That would have gone a long way to helping get us out of the disaster we are currently lost in.

Wall Collapse & Subway Delays

Was anyone delayed by the wall collapse on Lexington in the 30’s today?

Apparently, there was a 10 foot wall that collapsed at a construction site.  Emergency officials evacuated a neighboring building as a precaution because they feared that the ground movement might make the foundation of that building unstable.  It wasn’t really that bad though.

Then they ordered the MTA to slow train traffic on the 4, 5, and 6 through the area.  The train vibration can cause more ground settling.

Just wondering if there really was a big delay or not.  I’d imagine not.  Probably just right when it happened.

People in my office were flipping out that another building had collapsed.  Uhhhhh no.  Go back to work.

Being right all the time gets boring

So like I said, the rain is bad news.

My ride home was all f-ed up.  I got onto the platform only to see 10,000 other people already waiting for the train delayed due to rain.

By pure miracle, I made it onto the first train that finally came 15 minutes later.  People were getting so pissed that they left the station (to go back out into the rain!).  It just so happened that a guy in front of me got fed up and left.  A minute later, the train came and a door lined up with me perfectly.

The train immediately switched from a local to an express train…pissing off many.

So yeah, being right all the time is getting pretty old.

WTF? A $107 Metrocard in the Works

Metrocard bus

For that price, it had better come with at least two drinks.

The latest news is the very real possibility of subway fares going over $100 for monthly cards.  I call bullsh*t there not because of the price necessarily, but what we get.

I love the lead from the Daily News:

Brace yourself for the C-note MetroCard.

It is so true.

Anyway, back to my point about what we get.  Here’s the breakdown of what we could be facing in a C-note fare world.  A 30 day Metrocard goes from $81 to $104 with service cuts -OR- $107 without.

So basically, you’re going to get raped for a new Metrocard, it’s just a matter of how hard.  If you want to get your ass slapped with a $104 fare and decreased services (the double whammy), that’s one option.  If you want to get raped for $107, but still enjoy the same crap services you’ve always received, that’s the other whammy.

Notice that there was no fare for BETTER service than what we have now.  How about a $125 rate structure where we could actually benefit from better technology, faster service, less frequent breakdowns, and a fresh coat of paint.  Nooooooo…why think of that.

It’s way more fun for politicians use their chewing gum to plug the leaks in the dam than actually fix the problem.