“Courtesy is contagious…”

“…and it starts with you go f**k yourself.”

On the newer trains (like the 2 train), they’ve added some more public service announcements.  They aren’t especially new, but they seem to be playing them a lot more, and they’re starting to piss SUBWAYblogger off.

For the longest time, you only had a couple basic announcements from the voice in the ceiling.

“Backpacks and other large containers are subject to random search by the police.”

“Please do not block the doors while the train is in the station.”

“If you see a suspicious package or activity, do not keep it to yourself.  Tell a police officer or an MTA employee.”

Those pretty much summed it up for years.

Now there’s these obnoxious ones that say, “If you see an elderly, pregnant, or handicap person near you offer your seat.  You’ll be standing up for what’s right (pun intended).  Courtesy is contagious and it starts with you.”

First of all, lay off the “jokes.”  Standing up for what’s right?  Hey here’s an idea.  You hire staff that knows how to speak English when using the PA system.  That sounds “right” to me.  It’s not to much to ask to be able to hear and understand the more critical announcements.

If you want to stand up so that Mrs. Preggers or Grandma can sit down, fine.  If you don’t, who cares.  That’s life.  We don’t need you’re little reminders.

It’s almost as infuriating as President Obama having to hold a press conference to remind people to wash their hands in order to avoid swine flu.

Gents, let’s just stick to running the trains.

Your thoughts?

Upcoming Fare Hike Hearings

Fare Hearing Notice MTA

The MTA released notice that they will be conducting public hearings regarding fare hikes around the New York.

The hearings will begin in mid January and continue through the first week of February.

This is the initial part of the announcement:

Hearings will be held on proposed changes in fares and crossing charges, levels of service and partial or complete closings of subway stations or of means of public access to stations. Proposed changes are summarized below and pertain, as applicable, to MTA New York City Transit (NYCT), the Manhattan and Bronx Surface Transit Operating Authority (MaBSTOA), MTA Staten Island Railway (SIR), MTA Long Island Rail Road (LIRR), MTA Metro-North Railroad (MNR), MTA Bridges and Tunnels (B&T), MTA Long Island Bus (LI Bus) and MTA Bus.

Space limitations prevent newspaper publication of each proposed new fare or crossing charge [ohh how convenient] and of details of proposed changes at stations or in level of service. For more complete descriptions of these potential changes, please consult information posted at MTA stations and on the MTA website, http://www.mta.info or call 212-878-7483. Please note: other service adjustments and cost-reduction steps are under consideration that may also affect operation of subway, bus and rail lines, bridges and tunnels, staffing of stations and general provision of service. Although these possible changes do not require public hearing, they are described in informational material available on the MTA website.

You can read the entire PDF of the announcement here.

The announcement includes the boiled down details of the proposed fare hikes and service cuts. Read More »

MTA Doomsday Rate Raping OK’d

The MTA approved the doomsday budget yesterday that will allow them to hike the fares starting as early as Thursday this week.  The new budget would/will need to be approved tomorrow (Wednesday), and the new fare would kick in Thursday.

How much? Single rides would be $2.50.  The monthly unlimited Metrocard would jump to $104 at least (official source).   It could be more if the MTA picked the plan that had no service cuts.  However, it looks like there will be some service cuts in addition to the fare increase to keep the actual financial burden as low as possible.

So should I go buy 12 unlimited Metrocards right now while they are still just $81 ?  Will they be honored?  Technically, they don’t activate until their first use.

Cold Outside, Hot in Subway

This transitional period is always tough when it comes to planning your outfits for the day.

The cold has finally started to come.  Yeah we had a quick cold snap earlier in the fall, but then it warmed back up again.  Now it seems to be finally settling in.

So when you are walking to the train, you’re all bundled up because it can get pretty nippy out.  Then as soon as you get underground you realize it is hot as b*lls.  You’ll just be standing still on the platform and break out in a sweat.

It all has to do with that two to three day turnaround SUBWAYblogger always talks about.  Once it is finally cold once and for all above ground, it takes about three days for it to cool down underground.  The opposite is also true in the spring.

So it’s SUBWAYblogger’s advice to wear things that you can easily peel off once you get to the subway, then put back on when you get to your stop.  Complicated coats with lots of buttons and fancy scarfs might need to wait a few more weeks.

Of course, if you’re over 65 years old, and have more than two grand children you’ve probably had your winter parka on for about 6 weeks already.  So these tips are not really for you.

Hat season?  We’re going with no.  Not yet.  Scarfs?  Ehhh maybe.  Gloves?  Suck it up you wuss.  Hat’s with ear flaps? Never ok.

September Freebies: Ads On SUBWAYblogger.com

Back by popular demand, free ads on SUBWAYblogger.com. The free banner ads are available on a first come, first served basis only a week of your choosing in September.

We are offering a free, week long banner ad in our left sidebar (premium space!). You can pick any 7 days you like so it doesn’t have to be Mon-Sun.

If you are interested, just send an email to:

free [[at]] subwayblogger.com

You’ll get an email back with instructions within 5 minutes or less.

Once they are gone, they’re gone, but we will do it again next month.  They’ve been going faster and faster every month, so get going!

BREAKING NEWS: The Subway is Dirty

Further proof that the MTA is an embarrassing bureaucracy.

The MTA released the results of a comprehensive study that found the subway is dirty.  Folks, I wish it was a joke.  The MTA’s advocacy group’s 61 page [gasp] report said the stations are dirty aaaaaand many of them are literally falling apart.

Read the report for yourself.

Honestly, why do we need to study this stuff?  Can we just take a weekend, ride around to all the stops, and identify the ones that need the most work?  Oh wait, that’s all of them.

In other news, the new MTA Headquarters fire emergency plan was released:

(STEP 1)  Deny the existence of the fire as long as possible.

(STEP 2)  Ignore the first 100 emergency phone calls (min) related to this “alleged” blaze.

(STEP 3)  Mount a task force headed by an MTA Board member.  Call it the “Matchstick Committee.”

(STEP 4)  Hold a press release to announce the results fire existence study.

(STEP 5)  Hold emergency budget meeting to discuss fire extinguisher purchases.  Turns out, the ones in the building from 1932 are filled with seltzer water.

(STEP 6)  Increase fares.  New fire extinguishers won’t pay for themselves.

(STEP 7)  Perish in blaze.  Luckily, no MTA board members were actually in the office.  They were off hiding their government issued EZ Passes.