Keeping the Water Out Prevents Flooding. Brought to You By the MTA Office of Obvious Information

Ok, first of all, the MTA recently released a report about the August 8th flooding incident.  It was 88 pages long.  I shit you not.

There are 88 whole pages explaining that water and electric trains don’t mix.

There, in one sentence, I summed up what took the MTA 88 pages to explain.

At the six most flood-prone stations, the MTA and city Department of Transportation will design raised sidewalk gratings and perhaps add a step to entrances to keep water out. [NY Post]

Yes folks, adding a little step outside the subway entrances will actually significantly improve the situation should there be a sneak rain storm again.  Sometimes the simplicity of these solutions are so obvious that it makes my head hurt.

I mean seriously, when rain is cascading down the subway stairs like a waterfall, then yeah, a little lip at the top of the stairs sure would help!

The MTA also says it is going to invest in weather prediction systems like Doppler radar so that a storm can’t sneak up when no one is looking any more.  They are also going to work on alerting the media sooner when there is a major problem.  Oh, and making sure mta.info is up even on emergency days will be important too.

2 thoughts on “Keeping the Water Out Prevents Flooding. Brought to You By the MTA Office of Obvious Information

  1. the Mycast 5 app on my cell phone gets radar readings that are only 3 minutes old, which is newer than you get going to weather.com. perhaps the MTA could pay me to sit in Central Park and keep an eye on my phone for them. sure, it will cost em, but probably less than giving Doppler radar to just a few of the stations.

    Sedge

    ps…just found this blog recently and i love it!

    Like

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