Resident Discount Metrocards

So here’s an idea that came to my mind.  I’m sure I am not the first one to think of this, so I’m by no means trying to take credit.  I’m just trying to initiate the discussion.

What if Metrocards were priced based on residency?

People living in the 5 boros would receive a significant discount on Metrocards while people from out of town would pay the higher rate.

Let’s assume that the price of all fares are going up.  With that in mind, let’s make the out of towner rate a premium and residence get a break.  Maybe the price of a monthly unlimited card goes up to just $90 for residence.

You could sell them like TransitCheks.  Residents would simply receive their cards via mail or from their employers.  Or maybe it is just one card that automatically gets renewed month to month.  That way you would be able to verify who is a resident.

You could attach it to drivers liscences or ID cards even!

Just an idea.

Poll: How the Hell Do We Pay for this Crap?

Mayor Michael Bloomberg said it best today when he summed up the state of the MTA.  He says the MTA does not have a single dollar for it’s 2009 capital plan.  Not just falling a little short…literally does not have a single dollar.

So now law makers are scrambling to find revenue alternatives.  They are getting very desperate.

Governor Paterson is throwing around things like East River tolls, fare hikes, service cuts, and on and on.

[poll id=”10″]

You can refresh and vote up to three times if there’s more than one you like.

There’s probably some ideas missing, so hit them up in the comments.

More Pointless Message Boards

Looks like the MTA is still installing those pointless LED message boards.  The signage is designed to tell passenger when the next train will arrive as well as relay important messages.

The whole project has been a huge joke.  Some stations have had them installed for months if not a year or more.  The kicker…they’ve never worked.

Time was taken for them to be installed, but so far the system has only been tested.

I noticed that new ones were installed at my home station.  They are wrapped in plastic and duct tape right now, so I guess they aren’t ready yet.

Can’t manage to pay the electric bills, but we’re getting these epic boards.

Peace Out W and Z Lines

Due to a complete cluster f*ck of the MTA financial systems, the Daily News reports that the MTA has drawn up plans to shut down the W and Z lines as well as turn the J into a local train.

These plans are not official, but they seem like they’ll have to be put into place.

Additionally, as many as 1,500 jobs could be cut, overnight waiting times up to 30 minutes, and a fare hike making a single ride $3.00 seems to be right around the corner.

Here lies the problem.  The MTA is a bureaucracy controlled by the State up in Albany that really only impacts the lives of people in New York City.  (Yes, I know the MTA runs services in the burbs such as buses, etc.  But I’m concentrating in the bulk of the issues which are here in the city.)

So there really isn’t enough outrage on behalf of the citizens of New York.  For example, people living in Utica, NY could give a crap if the subway runs on time, or if the W and Z lines continue to be around.  So they aren’t going to say anything.  Actually, they’re probably against financial support of the MTA because it has nothing do do with them really.

Mark my words, major sh*t is about to go down.

Signage to Promote Express Metrocards

Did anyone else see signs, literally put up on easels, at your subway station advertising the new EasyPay Express Metrocards?

At Columbus Circle, they had a bunch of them printed up and set up at the main entrance.

In case you don’t know already, the MTA has set up a Metrocard that automatically refills itself when the balance gets low.  It’s kind of like an EasyPass for your car.  Once your MetroCard balance gets down to $30, it will aautomatically refill itself with $40 more.

For the pay-as-you-go crowd, this is probably a great idea.  It will certainly save you time, and you’ll never really have to worry about refilling your card again.  I only wish they did the same thing for the monthly unlimited cards.  They should have one that automatically renews itself each month.

Anyway, this is the first time I’ve seen the MTA set up these little sign boards to promote a new program.  Wonder if it will make a difference.

Mailbag – MTA Please Fix Jay

Got this email today from a SUBWAYblogger reader.

I wanted to let you know about my blog – MTA Please Fix Jay.

It’s dedicated to the conditions at the Jay Street-Borough Hall subway station in Brooklyn.

There are a few issues to deal with at the station:

1. the interior condition is a disaster.  Riders deserve to commute in a clean station.  Jay Street epitomizes neglect and disrespect.

2. the condition of the MTA owned building above the station is a disaster and a waste of money.  There is a sidewalk shed that has been there for a decade.  In the midst of a budget crisis the MTA has a valuable asset that they have left vacant for a decade.

3. the lack of attention outside the station means that cars (MTA vehicles included) park in the bus stops, forcing buses to double park in bike lanes and forcing riders to board in the middle of the street.

The blog is sarcastic and a bit silly, but the points are serious ones.  The MTA must serve us better.

MTA: You Lose It, We Sell It

We were reminded today by NYCtheBlog that the MTA regularly sells off stuff that they no longer want including your lost and found items.  Then again, I guess if you never claim your lost items, they really aren’t yours anymore but I digress.

You can buy everything from toll lane scrubbers (little Zamboni looking things), to office chairs, to subway poles, to subway lights, to your lost iPod.

Sometimes they have really high end electronics that get lost and found too.

You can buy yourself a little piece of subway history right from the source.  Check out the run down.

New MTA Security Ads

Oh the “See Something, Say Something” lameness continues.  The MTA has some new security ads out.

We took the three of them and strung them together.  They show unattended bags, with no voiceover.  Then shows the tip line phone number.  That’s it.  For some reason, the sound didn’t work when I put them together.  Just imagine the sounds of the subway.

http://www.viddler.com/player/508aee76/

So yeah.  I’m hoping they had interns make these, and didn’t actually pay anyone to make them.  What a joke.

Yankee Stadium Closing Breaks out Nostalgia Train

Tonight marks the closing of the “House that Ruth Built” up in the Bronx.  To help celebrate, the MTA rolled out the nostalgia train.

The four-car “Nostalgia Special” is scheduled to leave Grand Central-42nd Street at approximately 6 p.m., arriving at 161st Street-Yankee Stadium about 30 minutes later. The cars, originally operated by the Interborough Rapid Transit system, began service in 1917 and it is possible that at least one of them carried fans to the game on the first opening day. WCBS

In all likelihood, very few major Yankee fans took the nostalgia train to the game.  The stadium opened today at 3pm.  Fans were there insanely early today for the experience.  Getting to the stadium at around 6:40ish would probably be later than most fans wanted to be there.